Mother, Infant and Young Child Nutrition & Malnutrition Mother, Infant and Young Child Nutrition & Malnutrition - Feeding practices including micronutrient deficiencies prevention, control of wasting, stunting and underweight
  Home  ▫  News  ▫  India  ▫  Resources  ▫  Videos  ▫  Links  ▫  Forum  ▫  References  ▫  Site Map  ▫  About  ▫  Contact  ▫  Print
Healthy Nutrition
Malnutrition
Nutrition & HIV/AIDS
Nutrition Protection & Promotion
Early Malnutrition Detection
Malnutrition Management
Information Management
connect:  Follow MotherChild on Twitter  Connect with MotherChild on Facebook  Subscribe to HealthPhone on YouTube  

Early Detection and Referral of Children with Malnutrition

Back Next

Home  »  Early Malnutrition Detection and Referral  »  Growth Monitoring Chart   »  Interpreting Good or Bad Growth

Growth Monitoring Chart

Interpreting Good or Bad Growth

Child Growth Monitoring Chart
Explanation

Click here for a large image of this chart

Child Growth Monitoring Chart - Explanation

Table of Minimum Expected Weight Gain for Children Less than 2 Years

Click here for a large image of this chart

Table of Minimum Expected Weight Gain for Children Less than 2 Years

Good Growth

The child has gained enough weight if the curve is going up and the slope is parallel to one of the reference curves.

Even if the child is small, the growth curve should still go up and should be parallel to one of the reference curves to show the child is growing well.

If the child has missed one growth monitoring session, the "At 60 days" column of the Table of Minimum Expected Weight Gain should be used to calculate the child's expected weight, based upon his/her weight of two months before. The child's growth will be classified as adequate or inadequate.

If the child has missed two or more growth monitoring sessions, the child's weight should be plot on the growth card but it can not be joint with the previous dot. The "Adequate growth" can be assessed only in the next month.

Bad Growth

The child growth is static if the curve is flat. This is a dangerous sign that need to be further investigated.

The child has lost weight if the child's growth curve shows a downward direction.

The child's growth is slowing and the weight gain is less than expected if the curve is less steep than the reference curve.

Using the Table of Minimum Expected Weight Gain

Every child, whether big or small, should gain a known amount of weight each month if she/he is growing well.

The table of expected minimum weight gain gives the expected weights after one month and after two months. It is useful to check on a child's growth to determine whether a child has gained an adequate amount of weight or not.

Children should be referred for suspected acute malnutrition in the following cases:

  • They do not gain weight for more than two months.
     
  • They are losing weight.
     
  • They are falling below the bottom line:
     
    • A child below 2 years of age with plotted weight below the "low-weight-for-age" curve
       
    • A child two years old and above with plotted weight below the "very-low-weight-for-age" curve

Note: None of the above indicators are recognized by international standards as diagnostic criteria for admission in acute malnutrition treatment programs.



6 March, 2016
 


top of page


Home  ▫  Healthy Nutrition  ▫  Malnutrition  ▫  Nutrition & HIV/AIDS  ▫  Nutrition Protection & Promotion  ▫  Early Malnutrition Detection
Malnutrition Management  ▫  Information Management  ▫  News  ▫  India  ▫  Resources  ▫  Links  ▫  Forum  ▫  References  ▫  Site Map  ▫  About Us  ▫  Contact Us



The Mother and Child Health and Education Trust
our portals and sites


▫  Another child will die in ....
▫  HealthPhone™
▫  Guide to Child Care
▫  imagine
▫  Community Video
▫  HealthRadio
▫  Kyunki-Jeena Issi Ka Naam Hai
▫  Rehydration Project
▫  Successful Breastfeeding
▫  Disaster Relief
▫  Community Radio
▫  AIDS action
▫  Polio Free
▫  Untouchability
▫  Health Education to Villages
▫  Breast Crawl
▫  Education for Girls
▫  A Simple Solution
▫  Diarrhoea: 7 Point Plan
▫  HIV and Breastfeeding
▫  Rights of the Child
▫  Mother and Child Nutrition
▫  Mother and Child Health
▫  Facts for Life
▫  Education for Boys
▫  Child Protector
▫  HealthTube
▫  Ebola Resources


All information on this web site is for educational purposes only.
For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, kindly consult your doctor.


© The Mother and Child Health and Education Trust
A U.S. 501(c)(3) non profit organization

 



Feedback Form
Feedback Form