Mother, Infant and Young Child Nutrition & Malnutrition Mother, Infant and Young Child Nutrition & Malnutrition - Feeding practices including micronutrient deficiencies prevention, control of wasting, stunting and underweight
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Home  »  Healthy Nutrition  »  About Essential Nutrition Actions  »  Infant and young Child nutrition during and after illness

About Essential Nutrition Actions at Critical Stages in the Life Cycle of Women and Children

Infant and young Child nutrition during and after illness

The onset of malnutrition may be due to illness and bad recovery. Once a child is malnourished, he/she is more likely to suffer from infections and diseases due to lower body defences. Recovery is likely to take longer. This is called the malnutrition – infection cycle.

Many illnesses, including diarrhoea, measles, and respiratory infections can make the effects of malnutrition worse and vice versa. They stop the body from absorbing important nutrients and they also increase the body's need for more nutrients in the diet.

Key behaviours (0-6 months):

  1. During and after illness increase the frequency of breastfeeding for your baby to limit weight loss and encourage quicker recovery.
     
  2. Do not give other fluids, except medicines prescribed by a trained health worker.
     
  3. Carefully check the growth of your child during and after illness: visit the health centre or a trained community health volunteer immediately if the baby is losing weight during illness and/or has not regained weight after illness.
     
  4. As a lactating mother, you can continue to breastfeed even if you fall sick with a cold, flu or diarrhoea.


Key behaviours (6-24 months)
:

  1. During illness, increase the frequency of breastfeeding and offer additional food for your baby to limit weight loss and encourage quicker recovery.
     
  2. After illness, give one additional meal of solid food each day during the following two weeks to help the child regain weight.
     
  3. Use boiled/purified water for giving medicines.
     
  4. Provide low osmolarity ORS if the child has diarrhoea and ZINC supplementation for 10-14 days based on national protocol. You should be able to get ORS and Zinc from any primary health care facility.
     
  5. Carefully check the growth of your child during and after illness: visit the health centre or a trained community health volunteer immediately if the baby is losing weight during illness and/or has not regained weight after illness.


Check the Essential Nutrition Actions Key Messages Booklet for nutrition actions at critical life stages of women and children for a comprehensive overview.

Check recommendation on appropriate complementary foods.



6 March, 2016
 


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