Mother, Infant and Young Child Nutrition & Malnutrition Mother, Infant and Young Child Nutrition & Malnutrition - Feeding practices including micronutrient deficiencies prevention, control of wasting, stunting and underweight
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Mother, Infant and Young Child Nutrition and Malnutrition


Mother, Infant and Young Child
Nutrition and Malnutrition

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Management of Malnutrition in Children Under Five Years

Home  »  Management of Malnutrition in Children  »  Management of Severe Acute Malnutrition in Children Under Five Years  »  Medical Complications

Management of Severe Acute Malnutrition in Children Under Five Years

Medical Complications

If there is a serious medical complication then the patient should be referred for in-patient treatment – these complications include the following:

  • Bilateral pitting oedema Grade 3 (+++)
     
  • Marasmus-Kwashiorkor (W/H<70% with oedema or MUAC<11cm with oedema)
    MUAC Resources - Sources for MUAC Straps
     
  • Severe vomiting/ intractable vomiting
     
  • Hypothermia: axillary's temperature < 35°C or rectal < 35.5°C
     
  • Fever > 39°C
     
  • Number of breaths per minute:
     
    • 60 resps/ min for under 2 months
       
    • 50 resps/ minute from 2 to 12 months
      >40 resps/minute from 1 to 5 years
       
    • 30 resps/minute for over 5 year-olds or
       
    • Any chest in-drawing
       
  • Extensive skin lesions/ infection
     
  • Very weak, lethargic, unconscious
    Fitting/convulsions
     
  • Severe dehydration based on history & clinical signs
     
  • Any condition that requires an infusion or NG tube feeding.
     
  • Very pale (severe anaemia)
     
  • Jaundice
     
  • Bleeding tendencies
     
  • Other general signs the clinician thinks warrants transfer to the in-patent facility for assessment.

Note: Always explain to the mother/caregiver the choices of treatment option and decide with the mother/caregiver whether the child should be treated as an out-patient or in-patient despite the decision and advice of the health worker.

Source: Protocol for the management of Severe Acute Malnutrition (Ethiopia MOH)



6 March, 2016
 


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