Mother, Infant and Young Child Nutrition & Malnutrition Mother, Infant and Young Child Nutrition & Malnutrition - Feeding practices including micronutrient deficiencies prevention, control of wasting, stunting and underweight
  Home  ▫  News  ▫  India  ▫  Resources  ▫  Videos  ▫  Links  ▫  Forum  ▫  References  ▫  Site Map  ▫  About  ▫  Contact  ▫  Print
Healthy Nutrition
Malnutrition
Nutrition & HIV/AIDS
Nutrition Protection & Promotion
Early Malnutrition Detection
Malnutrition Management
Information Management
connect:  Follow MotherChild on Twitter  Connect with MotherChild on Facebook  Subscribe to HealthPhone on YouTube  

Infant Feeding & HIV/AIDS
Nutrition and HIV/AIDS

Infant Feeding in the Context of HIV/AIDS

Infant Feeding First Six Months
Infant Feeding from 6-12 months
HIV Testing and Follow-up

Mother, Infant and Young Child Nutrition and Malnutrition

Mother, Infant and Young Child
Nutrition and Malnutrition

HealthPhone: Nutrition, Health, Medical Training Videos


Vikaspedia: Reaching the ‘un-reached’ communities of India

Creative Commons Licence

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

 

Nutrition in the Context of HIV/AIDS

Back Next

Home  »  Nutrition in the Context of HIV/AIDS  »  Infant Feeding in the Context of HIV/AIDS  »  HIV Testing and Follow-up of HIV-exposed Children

Infant Feeding in the Context of HIV/AIDS

HIV Testing and Follow-up of HIV-exposed Children

  • HIV positive mothers should be able to access HIV laboratory tests. Antibody tests are the most widely used HIV diagnostic test and provide reliable evidence of HIV infection in children who are older than 18 months. HIV ELISA and rapid tests are the most common and do provide (or exclude) evidence of exposure. Virologic tests like PCR technologies can provide reliable evidence in babies aged 4-6 weeks. Infant feeding counselling should be provided at these key points when feeding decisions may be reconsidered.
     
  • Breastfeeding mothers of infants and young children who are known to be HIV-infected should be strongly encouraged to continue breastfeeding.
     
  • HIV-exposed children should receive regular follow-up care while HIV-infected children should access clinical staging and medical care to increase their chances of survival through timely initiation of antiretroviral therapy.


6 March, 2016
 


top of page


Home  ▫  Healthy Nutrition  ▫  Malnutrition  ▫  Nutrition & HIV/AIDS  ▫  Nutrition Protection & Promotion  ▫  Early Malnutrition Detection
Malnutrition Management  ▫  Information Management  ▫  News  ▫  India  ▫  Resources  ▫  Links  ▫  Forum  ▫  References  ▫  Site Map  ▫  About Us  ▫  Contact Us



The Mother and Child Health and Education Trust
our portals and sites


▫  Another child will die in ....
▫  HealthPhone™
▫  Guide to Child Care
▫  imagine
▫  Community Video
▫  HealthRadio
▫  Kyunki-Jeena Issi Ka Naam Hai
▫  Rehydration Project
▫  Successful Breastfeeding
▫  Disaster Relief
▫  Community Radio
▫  AIDS action
▫  Polio Free
▫  Untouchability
▫  Health Education to Villages
▫  Breast Crawl
▫  Education for Girls
▫  A Simple Solution
▫  Diarrhoea: 7 Point Plan
▫  HIV and Breastfeeding
▫  Rights of the Child
▫  Mother and Child Nutrition
▫  Mother and Child Health
▫  Facts for Life
▫  Education for Boys
▫  Child Protector
▫  HealthTube
▫  Ebola Resources


All information on this web site is for educational purposes only.
For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, kindly consult your doctor.


© The Mother and Child Health and Education Trust
A U.S. 501(c)(3) non profit organization

 



Feedback Form
Feedback Form