Mother, Infant and Young Child Nutrition & Malnutrition Mother, Infant and Young Child Nutrition & Malnutrition - Feeding practices including micronutrient deficiencies prevention, control of wasting, stunting and underweight
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Mother, Infant and Young Child Nutrition and Malnutrition

Mother, Infant and Young Child
Nutrition and Malnutrition

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Nutrition in the Context of HIV/AIDS

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Home  »  Nutrition in the Context of HIV/AIDS  »  Nutrition for People Living with HIV/AIDS  »  The Cycle of Malnutrition and HIV/AIDS

Nutrition for People Living with HIV/AIDS

The Cycle of Malnutrition and HIV/AIDS

Malnutrition is one of the major complications of HIV/AIDS infection and a significant factor in advancing the disease.

HIV infection can compromise nutrition through malabsorption and altered metabolism resulting in:

  • Weight loss
     
  • Loss of muscles and fat tissue
     
  • Vitamin and mineral deficiencies
     
  • Reduced immune function and competence
  •  
  • Increased susceptibility to secondary infections
     
  • Increased nutritional needs because of reduced food intake


People living with HIV and AIDS may not get enough food because of:

  • Drugs reducing their appetite
     
  • Infections causing sore-mouth, nausea and vomiting
     
  • Illnesses causing abdominal pain and damage of the the gut
     
  • Persistent diarrhoea
     
  • Reduced absorption of nutrients especially of fats and fat soluble vitamins
     
  • Increased tiredness, loneliness and depression leading to loss of appetite and anorexia
     
  • Reduced energy to work or produce food
     
  • Changes in their metabolism - the way the body transports, uses, stores and gets rid of nutrients


Malnutrition is significantly high among HIV-infected people.

Relationship Between HIV and Malnutrition

Relationship Between HIV and Malnutrition. Source – HIV/AIDS: A Guide for Nutrition Care and Support, 2001



6 March, 2016
 


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